Saturday, October 20, 2012

Planet Hunters discovered Planet with 4 Suns

People, all over the world, can collaborate on anything that they are passionate about and be respected for their contributions of ideas & information.  Feedback with either additional verification, clarification or modification from others is so fast.  Together we can learn so much !

I think it shows how wonderful the Internet is.

Move over, Tatooine! Amateurs discover planet with four suns
by Ed Payne, CNN
updated 6:10 PM EDT, Tue October 16, 2012

http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/16/us/space-planet-four-suns/index.html?npt=NP1

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The discovery of the four-sun planet by amateur scientists takes crowd sourcing to new heights. The expression, coined by Wired magazine editor Jeff Howe, describes tasks that are outsourced to a disparate group of people to come up with a solution.

In this case, the Planet Hunters group made data from NASA's $600 million Kepler telescope available to the public through its website and coordinates their findings with Yale astronomers.

In combing through the data, "Citizen scientists" Robert Gagliano and Kian Jek spied anomalies that confirmed the existence of the special planet, now known as PH1 -- short for Planet Hunters 1 -- the first heavenly body found by the online citizen science project.
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This is the blog for the online citizen science project Planet Hunters .
We're asking for your help looking for planets around other stars.
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http://blog.planethunters.org/2012/10/15/ph1-a-planet-in-a-four-star-system/

QUOTE:
Today we’re pleased to announce the discovery of the first confirmed planet discovered by Planet Hunters, and it’s a fabulous and unusual world.

 Labelled ‘Planet Hunters 1′ (or PH1) in a paper released today and submitted to the Astrophysical Journal, it is the first planet in a four-star system.

It is a circumbinary planet – one which orbits a double star – and our follow-up observations indicate that there is a second pair of stars approximately 90 billion miles (1000 Astronomical Units) away which are gravitationally bound to the system.
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